DAILY LAZY showing YES, BUT at ainsA friday, 11.april

DAILY LAZY showing YES, BUT at ainsA friday, 11.april

ainsA
köpenickerstrasse 4
10997 berlin FRIDAYOFLOVE
coming up friday 04.11 9pm


boy loves girl

FRIDAYOFLOVE by F60.4

come and drink with Stelios Karamanolis, Tula Plumi, Fridey Mickel, Jurgen Ostarhild

DAILY LAZY showing YES, BUT, by TASIOS PAVLOS athen 1972

 F.60.4

...since march 14th 2014 every friday night an artshow
in collaboration with FRIDEY MICKEL, ainsA and JURGEN OSTARHILD 







Plot:The movie takes place in Athens during it's dictatorship in early 70s. A young man, Fanis, works at a funeralhome and lives an ordinary life with a woman whom he doesn't love, but was forced to marry due to societal ethics. His everyday is constant oppression and he creates fantasies with other women he meets. His wife's infertility deprives even the possibility to find meaning in his marriage through the child. Randomly he meets a student, Melanie, on whom he develops a crush.

A conversation with Evita Tsokanta

Karl Kraus, In dieser grossen Zeit, 1914

In these great times which I knew when they were this small; which will become small again, provided they have time left for it; and which, because in the realm of organic growth no such transformation is possible, we had better call fat times and, truly, hard times as well; in these times in which things are happening that could not be imagined and in which what can no longer be imagined must happen, for if one could imagine it, it would not happen; in these serious times which have died laughing at the thought that they might become serious; which, surprised by their own tragedy, are reaching for diversion and, catching themselves redhanded, are groping for words; in these loud times which boom with the horrible symphony of actions which produce reports and of reports which cause actions: in these times you should not expect any words of my own from me – none but these words which barely manage to prevent silence from being misinterepreted. Respect for the immutability, the subordination of language before this misfortune is too deeply rooted in me. In the realm of poverty of imagination where people die of spiritual famine without feeling spiritual hunger, where pens are dipped in blood and swords in ink,  that which is not thought must be done, but that which is only thought is unutterable. Expect no words of my own from me. Nor would I be able to say anything new, for in the room in which one writes there is such noise, and at this time one should not determine whether it comes from animals, form children or merely from mortars. He who encourages deeds with words desecrates words and deeds and is doubly despicable. This occupation is not extinct. Those who now have nothing to say because actions are speaking continue to talk. Let him who has something to say come forward and be silent! Nor may I bring out old words as long as deeds are committed that are new to us and spectators say that they were notto be expected of them. […]But I am truly of the opinion that in this time, however we may call itor evaluate it, whether it is out of joint or already set right, whether it is accumulating murder and rottenness before the eyes of a Hamlet or is already becoming ripe for the arm of a Fortinbras – thatin its condition the root lies at the surface. This sort of thing can be made clear by a great confusion, and what was once paradoxical is now confirmed by the great times. Since I am neither a politician norhis half-brother, an esthete, I would not dream of denying the necessity of anything that is happening or of complaining that mankind does not know how to die in beauty. […]The necessity to eat in order to live cannot be disputed philosophically, though the public nature of this function evidences an ineradicable lack of modesty. Culture is the tacit agreement to let the means of subsistence disappear behind the purpose of existence. Civilization is the subordination of the latter to the former. […]

In these great Times: A Karl Kraus Reader, Manchester, edited by H. Zohn, 1976/84

John F Kennedy snagged 1,200 Cuban cigars before 1962 trade embargo


President John F. Kennedy secured for himself 1,200 Cuban cigars just hours before enacting the Cuban trade embargo in 1962. Before signing the embargo, Kennedy requested his head of press, Pierre Salinger, to get him “1,000 Petit Upmanns.”
Salinger first made the revelation to Cigar Aficiando magazine in 1992.


Salinger recalled Kennedy summoning him into his office to see if he could provide 'some help' in securing 'a lot of cigars' by the following morning. In hindsight, it is evident that Kennedy wanted to stockpile the Cuban products before he banned their import.
“The next morning, I walked into my White House office at about 8am, and the direct line from the President's office was already ringing. He asked me to come in immediately,” said Salinger.
Kennedy was pleased to learn that Salinger was successful and had gotten him 1,200 Cuban cigars.
Salinger remembers, “He took out a long paper which he immediately signed. It was the decree banning all Cuban products from the United States. Cuban cigars were now illegal in our country.”
The story of Kennedy’s cigars reemerged in 2012 as the United States rolled into its 50th year of trade embargo with Cuba. The embargo is a source of political debate today.
Supporters believe that the trade restrictions are justified as Cuba continues its “repressive” form of government, while critics are vocal that it has hurt the Cuban population rather than the government itself.


Theophilos Hatzimihail (Θεόφιλος)


































  Theophilos Hatzimihail (Θεόφιλος Χατζημιχαήλ or Θεόφιλος Κεφαλάς; ca. 1870, Vareia, nearMytilene, island of LesbosGreece – Vareia, 22 March, 1934), known simply asTheophilos, was a major folk painter of Neo-Hellenic art. The main subject of his works are Greek characters and the illustration of Greek traditional folklife and history.

COL O BARAS Delivers Injustice



First look on the upcoming "Col O' Bara Delivers Injustice" in thriller/horror style. An action/crime/thriller/comedy taking place somewhere between the 70's and the 80's. Col O' Bara is a cop that doesn't hesitate to play out of the rules and he tends to do that a lot. With his sidekick, played by Nico Pipico (Nick Diamantidis), he confronts the "crem de la crem" of the criminal underworld while making a mess out of everything with their unorthodox ways and their incompetence...A 10-minute promo will soon be released and you'll be able to watch it here at "Theodoras Vogiatzidis Productions" blog.

Written by Theodoras Vogiatzidis and Stelios Karamanolis. Directed and edited by Theodoras Vogiatzidis. Starring Stelios Karamanolis as Al J. Heimer as Col O' Bara, Nick Diamantides
as Nico Pipico, Jim Tsiamis as "Chief", Dimo Balo, Theodoras Vogiatzidis, Georgia Karydi, Stavros Karizonis, Tasos Kasapis and Zoi Nikolaou as Mikaela.


WATCH HORROR STYLE TEASER


A conversation with Tina Pandi

For the A conversation with, I would like to send you Schema, 1966 by Dan Graham which was originally published in 1967 in Aspen magazine (no. 5+6). In this work, Graham proposed a poem-generator, a “schema’ for composing a poem the specific form of which is determined by each editor (or viewer-reader) every time it is published.

Tina Pandi




POEM, MARCH 1966 / DAN GRAHAM


Schema for a set of poems whose component pages are specifically published as individual poems in various magazines. Each poem-page is to be set in its final form by the editor of the publication where it is to appear, the exact data in each particular instance to correspond to the fact(s) of its published appearance.

1 Using any arbitrary schematic (such as the example published here) produces a large, finite permutation of specific, discrete poems.
2 If a given variant-poem is attempted to be set up by the editor following the logic step-by-step (linearly), it would be found impossible to compose a completed version of the poem as each of the component lines of exact data requiring completion (in terms of specific numbers and percentages) would be contingently determined by every other number and percentage which itself in turn would be determined by the other numbers or percentages, ad infinitum.
3 It would be possible to 'compose' the entire set of permutationally possible poems and to select the applicable variant(s) with the aid of a computer which could 'see' the ensemble instantly.


SCHEMA

(number of)
(number of)
(percentage of)
(percentage of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(perimeter of)
(weight of)
(type)
(thinness of of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of point)
(name of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
(number of)
adjectives
adverbs
area not occupied by type
area occupied by type
columns
conjunctions
depression of type into surface of page
gerunds
infinitives
letters of alphabet
lines
mathematical symbols
nouns
numbers
participles
page
paper sheet
paper stock
paper stock
prepositions
pronouns
size type
typeface
words
words capitalized
words italicized
words not capitalized
words not italicized

POEM

35
7
35.52%
64.48%
1
1
0 mms.
0
0
247
28
6
51
29
6
8" x 8"
80 lb.
dull coated
.007"
3
0
10
Universe 55
61
3
0
58
61
adjectives
adverbs
area not occupied by type
area occupied by type
columns
conjunctions
depression of type into surface of page
gerunds
infinitives
letters of alphabet
lines
mathematical symbols
nouns
numbers
participles
page
paper sheet
paper stock
paper stock
prepositions
pronouns
size type
typeface
words
words capitalized
words italicized
words not capitalized
words not italicized

Original format: Single sheet, 16 by 8 inches, folded to make four pages.






THE NOVEL THAT PREDICTS RUSSIA’S INVASION OF CRIMEA

idov-crimea.jpg
“Who wouldn’t recognize, amid the crazed architectural flourishes of Downtown Simferopol, the assertive skyscraping simplicity of the pencil-like home of the Russian Courier.” Thus begins one of my favorite novels of the twentieth century. The same novel ends with Russia annexing Crimea after its citizens are snookered into requesting the invasion themselves: in other words, it eerily anticipates this week’s news.

new vocabulary


Villa Müller Adolf Loos


Villa Müller in Prague was designed by architect Adolf Loos, assisted by architect Karel Lhota, in 1930 for František Müller and his wife, Milada Müllerová. The client was the owner of a company specialized in reinforced concrete, so the house was to be a showcase of this (at the time) pioneering technique as well as of the influent architect’s theories. The Villa, with its cubic shape and its white and austere façade, embodies in its exterior appearance the principles exposed by the architect in his seminal essay “Ornament and Crime”.
A strong contrast is staged between the simple, almost hermetic façade and the rich and complex interiors cladded in marble for the public areas and wood for the private rooms. The distribution is based on the principles of the Raumplan (spatial plan) already applied by Loos for the Ministry of War (“Kriegsministerium”) in Vienna in 1907. The Villa Mueller’s Raumplan is a complex exercise set to avoid the organization in separated floors and structure the space in a sequence of stepped areas while differentiating the height of the ceiling in relation to different functions.

always and forever

Why do you love me 
Why do you need me 
Always and forever 

We met in a chat room 
Now our love can fully bloom 
Sure, the World Wide Web is great 
But you, you make me 'salvivate' 

Yes, I love technology 
But not as much as you, you see 
But I still love technology 
Always and forever 

Our love is like a flock of doves

Flying up to heaven above 
Always and forever 
Always and forever 

Yes, our love is truly great 
Always and forever 

Why do you need me 
Why do you love me... 

Sorry I'm late. I just got done taming a wild honeymoon stallion for you guys. 
Hey Deb, can you take a photo of me on the horse real quick' 
Sure. 
Thanks. 
I hope you guys's experiences are unforgettable. 
Lookee lookee, a little keepsake for you guys. 
Lucky.



MIB: Alive And Kicking


This past weekend, I lectured at the Philadelphia-based conference of thePennsylvania chapter of MUFON, the Mutual UFO Network. It was an excellent gig, thanks to organizer John Ventre and the team. The presenters included MUFON member Fred Saluga, who spoke about the UFO-Cryptozoology connection, and Bill Weber, who detailed a very intriguing radar-visual-based UFO event. Tom Carey shared with the audience his findings on the Roswell affair, while Bill Birnes and Pat Uskert entertained everyone with a behind-the-scenes look at their TV show, UFO Hunters.
Travis Walton discussed his book Fire in the Sky and John Ventre asked the thought-provoking questions regarding UFOs: “Do you know? Should you know?” Antonio Paris dug deep into 21st Century Ufology, Anthony Sanchez shared his findings on the “Dulce Underground Alien Base” saga, Jon Maberry gave an excellent presentation on UFOs and pop-culture, and Richard Lang  focused on UFO methodology. And then there was me.

21 Creative Furniture Design Ideas For Pets


1. Cat-Friendly Modular Bookshelf

Designed by Corentin Dombrecht

Jackson Pollock by Hans Namuth




"Not satisfied with black and white stills, Namuth wanted to create a color film that managed to focus on Pollock and his painting at the same time, partially because he found more interest in Pollock's image than in his art. His solution was to have Pollock paint on a large sheet of glass as Namuth filmed from underneath the work. As Namuth could not afford professional lighting, the film was shot outside Pollock's Long Island home. This documentary (co-produced with Paul Falkenberg) is considered one of the most influential for artists."

"In November 1950, Namuth and Pollock's relationship came to an abrupt conclusion. After coming in from the cold-weather shoot of the glass painting, Pollock, who had been treated in the 1930s for alcoholism, poured himself a tumbler of bourbon whiskey after supposedly having been sober for two years. An argument between Namuth and Pollock ensued with each calling the other a "phony", culminating in Pollock overturning a table of food and dinnerware in front of several guests

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Na...

Eva Rothschild

Prehistoric Saharan Rock Art


    Garamantian chariot pulled by two horses - Wadi Tashwinat valley, Acacus (Fezzan), southern Libya.

A conversation with Maria Passarivaki

ARTMIRRORSLIFE

1. Nan Goldin, Rise and Monty Kissing (1988), New York City & Louise Bourgeois, Couple, 2001

2. Louise Bourgeois, The Good Mother, 2006 & Hannah Putz, Untitled 2011-2013



3. Louise Bourgeois, The Inward Vision, 2008 & Nan Goldin, Rebecca on the bed, Hydra, Greece, 1994

4. Louise Bourgeois, Eugénie Grandet, 2009 & Jackie Onassis at an 'April in Paris' ball, Slim Aarons, 1959


''Life imitates Art far more than Art imitates Life'', Oscar Wilde, A collection of essays titled Intentions, 1891


And what of the art that we never made and the life which has vanished?

When humanity began to discern one of its greatest expressions, art had surely already wielded its charms and unexpected manifestations in the past throughout history.  And if we still enjoy recognizing art, where humanity has passed but it is still historically present, it is because it gives me the pleasure of a perception that has already been lived.  Art stands over its own form, and is a confirmation that life is manifested, almost betraying its very essence to defend the fact that  itself condemns us.  Through art we come to reconcile with life and its most seductive promises: seduction, love, fidelity, history. Every defeat is resurrected by art. The resurrected work of art is as identical to the original as possible, with one exception. However, there is always an added element, a sign standing by its side.

Art is a stolen moment or encounter - often expressed. It can open new roads, it can irritate when unfamiliar. What is true about Art is true about Life, nevertheless.

Some may find my thematic choice presumptuous, but it is not so. Rather it is a set of margins within which I can share what art means to me. I love the works above because their elements possess an innocence to the power of art, something that is undeniable and ever-present today. Within them are people, artworks, moments and rare points of view that mirror what life is for everyone - hidden, unconscious and magnetic.

I close these lines by asking the same one to you....
https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/images/cleardot.gif


The Shining - Alternate Versions


Stanley Kubrick shot Jack's typewriter pages in different languages for release in different countries. Such localized versions were released internationally in theaters, on video and on TV. The DVD releases of 2001 and 2007, however, only feature the English version of the text.
In all previous video versions of The Shining, (prior to the 2001 DVD re-release), each title card failed to change in synchronization with the music. Upon being released on DVD, each title card does in fact change in sync with the music, the way it was originally intended.
Three days after the release of the film, Stanley Kubrick and Warner Bros. ordered all projectionists to cut about 2 minutes from the end of the film, and send the footage back to the studio. Starting after the closeup of frozen Jack, the camera goes to a pullback shot with part of a state trooper's car and the legs of troopers walking around in the foreground. We then cut to the hotel manager Stuart Ullman (Barry Nelson) walking down a hospital hallway to the nurse's station to inquire about Danny and Wendy. He's told they're both doing well and proceeds to Wendy's room. After some gentle conversation, he tells Wendy that searchers have been unable to locate any evidence of the apparitions she saw. Additionally, Jack's body cannot be located. We then cut to the camera silently roaming the halls of the Overlook Hotel for about a minute until it comes up to the wall with the photographs, where it [back to the ending as it is now known] fades in on the photo of Jack in the 1921 picture.

Source Code in TV and Films

Another useless information, images of the computer code appearing in TV and films and what they really are. 


People Wear Pants Because Cavalry Won Wars

Duke University evolutionary biologist Peter Turchin, writing about the proposed cultural evolution of pants, says,
If we go back to the ‘Cradle of the Western Civilization,’ the Mediterranean region two thousand years ago, we will find that none of the civilized people there (notably the Greeks and the Romans, but also Phoenicians and Egyptians) wore pants.
But zipping forward in time for about a thousand years, all of a sudden pants are everywhere.
Why did the Italians switch from tunics to pants? The answer is the horse. Not only are the horses responsible for why we live in complex, large-scale societies (or, at least, how such large-scale societies first evolved), they are also the reason why males have to swelter in pants in summer, instead of wearing the cool kilt.
All around the world, societies which had mastered the art of horseback combat wiped out those that hadn’t. The theory goes that men in battle need protect their most sensitive organ, and riding sidesaddle is not particularly amenable to the chaos of combat.
Writing in The AtlanticAlexis Madrigal adds to the discussion the similar history of the bicycle and the decline in long, frilly dresses. Madrigal says,
What all these examples suggest is that technological systems — cavalry, bicycling — sometimes require massive alterations in a society’s culture before they can truly become functional. And once it’s locked in, the cultural solution (pants) to an era’s big problem can be more durable than the activity (horse-mounted combat) that prompted it.


Read more: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/smartnews/2012/07/people-wear-pants-because-cavalry-won-wars/#ixzz2pj2w8aqq 

Old Cincinnati Library, circa 1900

Unseen World War I photos

By Dean Putney
The following photos were taken from 1914-1918 by my great-grandfather Lt. Walter Koessler during his time as a German officer in the first World War. They're part of a collection of over a thousand photos, stereographs and their negatives that my family has been saving for a century. This is an unusually large and complete collection, and I've taken on the task of preserving it and printing it so other people can experience this history too.



RIP MIKE VRANEY



Mike Vraney, founder of the underground/exploitation film distro concern Something Weird Video, died yesterday after a long struggle with lung cance. Something Weird Video confirmed the really sad news via their officialFacebook


In Memorium
MIKE VRANEY
Founder of Something Weird
December 29, 1957 to January 2, 2014
We regret to tell you that Something Weird’s founder, Mike Vraney, passed away on January 2, 2014 after a long heroic battle with lung cancer. He was 56 years old, way too young to leave this planet. There was still so much Mike wanted to do in his life, so many films to be found, and adventures to be embarked upon.
This sad news may come as a shock to most of you. Mike was a very private person and didn’t want anyone, except his closest friends, family and colleagues, to know about his illness. He went through aggressive chemotherapy and radiation treatments for over a year, but sadly the cancer spread and cruelly took him from us.
Mike had a larger-than-life personality and a genuine enthusiasm for movies. Something Weird was his heart and soul, he was obsessive in his pursuit of tracking down the weirdest, wildest movies out there. And it wasn’t enough to find a few forgotten films, he was always in search of the movie motherload. (Making 370 two-hour volumes of Nudie Cuties loops is a good example of this. Who does that?! Mike Vraney!) Even as a child, Mike loved movies. During his teenage years, he worked at the Bel-Kirk Drive-In, and then later as a projectionist at the Green Parrot and Apple Theaters in Seattle. Then around 1990, Mike went in search of as many old, unusual, obscure, and lost low budget exploitation movies as he could, and preserved them for prosperity. Mike amassed thousands of these rare movies and had them transferred to video so that people could relive the good old days of going to the drive-in or grindhouse theater, in their very own home. We have him to thank for introducing fandom to the wonderful world of sexploitation sinema, rescuing it from the dark recesses of forgotten film vaults and defunct movie theatres.
Some of you may know that prior to Something Weird, Mike was involved in the early Seattle punk rock music scene. He was a partner in Modern Productions, the group who started Seattle’s seminal rock venue, The Showbox, in 1979. Mike then went on to manage such well-known bands as The Dead Kennedys, TSOL, and Seattle’s own The Accused. Mike always seemed to be at the forefront of whatever was happening and cool.Mike’s second greatest passion in life was collecting old comics, vintage toys, movie memorabilia, and pop cultural ephemera. He enjoyed going to the swap meet and always had a magical ability for finding great stuff. But when he wasn’t working, collecting, or telling great stories, Mike spent quality time with his beloved family. Mike adored his wife and business partner, Lisa, and two (now young adult) children, Mark and Danielle. These three were the center of his universe, and his reason for getting up each and every morning.
The folks at Something Weird fully intend to honor Mike’s incredible legacy. Mike may be gone, but his remarkable achievements will live on. One of the happiest days of Mike’s life was when legendary David F. Friedman and Dan Sonney called him “the forty-first thief,” which to him was the ultimate compliment and recognition for his work. We’d like to think that Mike’s now hanging out with his old pals Dave and Dan, reminiscing and talking shop with Dwain Esper, Kroger Babb, Barry Mahon, Joe Sarno, Doris Wishman, Bob Cresse, Dale Berry, Michael Findlay and all the other exploiteers and smut peddlers who’ve gone to the great grindhouse in the sky.
We will miss Mike with all our hearts. Goodbye dear friend, husband, father, and fearless leader…
– Lisa Petrucci, Tim Lewis, Kendall Bechtel, Mark Vraney, Danielle Vraney of Something Weird Video



STREET LAW AKA IL CITTADINO SI RIBELLA (1974)

Carlo Antonelli, an engineer from Genoa has a bad day. He unluckily gets mugged and beaten by a gang of thieves during a bank robbery. Carlo can't let that incident go and desides to take justice into his own hands. He will discover that the underworld is far more cruel than he expected. One of the best performances by Franco Nero. Written by    and . Directed by . Starring 
Via cultmoviesblog.blogspot.gr




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